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Calendar

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1
Grand Opening: Indoor Flea Market 9:00 am
Grand Opening: Indoor Flea Market @ Roosevelt Mall
Jan 1 @ 9:00 am
’til 4:00pm. Come check out this indoor flea market! Open every Saturday and Sunday through March. The outdoor market will resume its normal schedule April through November, 2022.
2
Grand Opening: Indoor Flea Market 9:00 am
Grand Opening: Indoor Flea Market @ Roosevelt Mall
Jan 2 @ 9:00 am
’til 4:00pm. Come check out this indoor flea market! Open every Saturday and Sunday through March. The outdoor market will resume its normal schedule April through November, 2022.
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Alliance Française Doylestown/Bucks County meets 9:45 am
Alliance Française Doylestown/Bucks County meets @ St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
Jan 5 @ 9:45 am
Table ronde: How did you manage surviving the pandemic? Did you read books, find new television series, find a new pastime, gain weight? All levels of fluency are welcome. Meets on alternate Wednesdays (except July and August).
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Feb
13
Sun
Lecture – The Revolutionary World of a Free Black Man: Jacob Francis 1754-1836 @ Washington Crossing Historic Park
Feb 13 @ 1:30 pm

This lecture will be held in-person in the Visitor Center Auditorium unless COVID or weather restrictions necessitate a change to a virtual format. If the program is held virtually, registrants will be notified and sent a Zoom link. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRERD.

William L. Kidder will discuss his new book The Revolutionary World of a Free Black Man: Jacob Francis 1754-1836 .

Born in Amwell Township to a free Black mother, Jacob Francis lived his 82-year life in a world of revolutionary change. He became caught up in the rising tide of revolution in the 1760s and 70s and served fourteen months in the 16th Continental Army regiment, including at the Battle of Trenton, and then in the Third Hunterdon County militia regiment for over six years. Establishing himself as a farmer, he married an enslaved woman named Mary, freed her and together they raised their nine children in the vicinity of Flemington during a period of rising interest in abolition. The story of Jacob Francis and his family provides an inside view of life in New Jersey in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and the revolutionary changes affecting the lives of both free and enslaved Black people.