Campers may still register for Summer Day Camps

Campers may still register for 2014 Summer Day Camps in Lower Southampton Township, it was recently announced by Matt Gilbert, Parks and Recreation Director.

In making the announcement, Matt says that there are still slots available for interested families and he is gearing up for an exciting and energetic nine-week camping experience for youngsters from June 23rd to August 24th.

“This year’s camps will feature a full share of recreational activities, crafts, instructional enrichment and fun-filled cultural excursions,” he relates. “Our program has been carefully designed to allow every child to grow and mature through a series of supervised programs and activities embracing physical development, socialization, teamwork and camaraderie.”

Camp will be divided into a series of age- segmented groups starting with the  Pioneer Camp for children ages three to five, which will be located at Russell Elliott Memorial Park on Buck Road. Discovery Camp for ages five to 12 and seven to 12 will be run simultaneously at two locations, the Dolphin Swim Club, 260 West Bristol Road, and the Joseph J. Ferderbar Elementary School, 300 Heights Lane. Teen Camp for teens 13-years plus also will be located at the Dolphin Swim Club. There also will be a Counselor-In-Training Program for teenagers 13-years of age and beyond which will be housed at the Dolphin or Ferderbar locations. “We have wonderful programs for children of all ages, however, I encourage parents to register early because space is limited,” Matt notes.

In 2014, special Summer Day Camp resident rates will be offered to all people residing in the 19053 zip code and all of Upper Southampton Township. Cost for a youngster residing in those areas is $649 for the season with a $155  deposit required. The non-resident rate is $849 per child with a $234 deposit required.

A full camp payment schedule and further information is available on request at 215 -357-7300, extension 340 or online at www.lowersouthamptontownship.org.

Share

Registration has begun for 2014 Summer Day Camps

Registration has begun for the 2014 Summer Day Camps in Lower Southampton Township, it was recently announced by Matt Gilbert, Parks and Recreation Director.

In making the announcement, Matt says that the township is gearing up for an exciting and energetic nine-week camping experience for youngsters from June 23rd to August 24th, which will feature a full share of recreational activities, crafts, instructional enrichment and fun-filled cultural excursions.

“Our program has been carefully designed to allow every child to grow and mature through a series of supervised programs and activities embracing physical development, socialization, teamwork and camaraderie.”

Camp will be divided into a series of age-segmented groups starting with the Pioneer Camp, for children ages three to five, which will be located at Russell Elliott Memorial Park on Buck Road. Discovery Camp for ages five to 12, and seven to 12, will be run simultaneously at two locations, the Dolphin Swim Club, 260 West Bristol Road, and the Joseph J. Ferderbar Elementary School, 300 Heights Lane. Teen Camp for teens 13 to 18 also will be located at the Dolphin Swim Club. There also will be a Counselor-In-Training Program for teenagers 13-years of age and beyond which will be housed at the Dolphin or Ferderbar locations.

“We have wonderful programs for children of all ages, however, I encourage parents to register early because space is limited,” Matt notes.

In 2014, special Summer Day Camp resident rates will be offered to all people residing in the 19053 zip code and all of Upper Southampton Township. Cost for a youngster residing in those areas is $649 for the season with a $150 deposit required.  The non-resident rate is $849 per child with a $229 deposit required.

A full camp payment schedule and further information is available on request at 215-357-7300, extension 340 or online at www.lowersouthamptontownship.org.

The Lower Southampton Township Parks and Recreation Department is headquartered at 1500 Desire Avenue in Feasterville.

Share

Be cool at the pool

Lower Makefield Township is now offering 2014 pool memberships at low rates. Enjoy four heated pools, three diving boards, plus a flume and speed slides. In addition, swim and dive teams, swim lessons, Mommy & Me sessions, water aerobics, swim camp and Aqua Zumba are available. You can also utilize their Wifi while there.

For more information contact the Lower Makefield Township Pool Office at 267-274-1105 or visit the Township website at www.lmt.org.

Share

Be cool at the pool

Lower Makefield Township is now offering 2014 pool memberships at low rates. Enjoy four heated pools, three diving boards, plus a flume and speed slides. In addition, swim and dive teams, swim lessons, Mommy & Me sessions, water aerobics, swim camp and Aqua Zumba are available. You can also utilize their Wifi while there.

For more information contact the Lower Makefield Township Pool Office at 267-274-1105 or visit the Township website at www.lmt.org.

Share

CR North students return with summer memories

by Rachel Freeman, junior, Council Rock High School North

Council Rock North Senior Matt Holland was not expecting to learn how to fly during his family vacation to Florida this summer. Matt had been dreaming of going skydiving since he was eight-years-old, but the opportunity didn’t present itself until his family surprised him with a trip to iFLY Orlando – an indoor skydiving facility.

“My reaction was about the same as a six-year-old going to Disney World for the first time,” Matt said. “I was extremely excited.”

iFLY uses a vertical wind tunnel to simulate the skydiving experience.

The tunnel “creates true free fall conditions, without having to jump out of an airplane,” according to the facility’s website.

“It was one of the greatest moments in my life,” said Matt.

Matt isn’t the only North student who created timeless memories this summer. Taylor Roberts-Sampson, a junior at CRN, spent five weeks in Israel over the break.

Taylor is part of a “youth movement that empowers kids to change and better the world,” she explained.

She lived on a kibbutz, an Israeli communal settlement, while she participated in many community service projects, including building a new kindergarten. She made sure her voice was heard during group discussions about Israeli society and what needs to change in Israel. She got to spend time with the kids that live on the Kibbutz, too.

She spoke with them about what they do for fun and how they feel about where they live.

Taylor believes that her summer experience made her a better person. “I brought back with me a new view of the world and all the different societies that exist within it,” she said.

Many students who stayed home for the summer made great memories, too. Junior Steven Miller spent his 12th summer at Willow Grove Day Camp here in PA.

“Working at camp taught me how important it is to treat people with respect and make sure all of my responsibilities are fulfilled,” Miller said. “I’ll definitely apply those values to this school year.”

Now with plenty of summer stories to tell, students return to school with positive attitudes and rested brains (at least until their first tests).

Share

Cool, refreshing brews for hot summer days

submitted by Ryan Magaskie, New Hope Beverage

It’s too damn hot, and the fall and winter months are too far away. Each day is another inferno layer of hell we must battle, and like Virgil, I will guide you through it with some refreshing and tasty beverages.

First up this month is the “Fleur de Lehigh” brought to you by Philadelphia Brewing Co. This unfiltered golden ale is brewed with ginger and lemon grass. True to its name in full, it pours a rich hazy golden color and tastes of tart orange, ginger, and lemongrass upfront and finishes smooth with small peppery notes and a citrus rind twang.

The second beer I have for you to try is Flying Fish’s “Farm House Summer Ale.” This American blonde ale sports a golden-copper body with excellent white lacing head. The taste does not disappoint either, with notes of sweet citrus and doughy malts upfront and finishes with small licks of herbal spices.

If you’re looking for something new to try this summer these two styles will treat you right.

Stay cool! And as always please drink responsibly.

Share

Be aware of food safety risks in warm weather

submitted by McCaffrey’s

Summertime brings images of barbecues and picnics, fresh vegetables and colorful fruits.

However, the warm weather can also bring along some food safety risks.  To minimize your risk of unwanted bacteria and foodborne illness, keep the following tips in mind:

  • When preparing meats, poultry and fish, be sure to keep raw and cooked foods separate. Use one plate for raw foods and a different plate for the finished product. If using frozen meats, plan ahead and defrost meat one to two days in advance in the refrigerator. Leaving raw meat and poultry on the countertop to defrost will allow dangerous bacteria to grow;
  • When grilling, keep a thermometer handy to make certain foods are cooked to the proper temperature. While it may appear that a food is cooked, color is not an accurate way to determine if food is actually ready to eat.
  • Marinades are a wonderful way to flavor and tenderize grilled food. Be sure to keep some extra marinade in reserve to use for serving. Used marinades will contain raw juices and should be tossed to avoid contamination of cooked foods;
  • Meats, salads and other perishable foods should never be left out at room temperature for more than two hours. When weather is above 90 degrees, put leftovers into the refrigerator within the hour. Any perishable foods that are left out past the time limits should be tossed.   When in doubt, throw it out! To keep foods safe, smaller serving bowls can be used. Simply refill or replace serving bowls with fresh food as needed. Cooking times of foods on the grill can also be staggered to keep foods fresh and hot.

For proper cooking temperatures and other food safety information, click on to the Partnership for Food Education at www.fightbac.org or the Food Safety and Inspection Service site of the USDA at www.fsis.usda.gov.

Visit the McCaffrey’s website at www.mccaffreys.com for recipes, nutrition information and to find out about free nutrition programs at the store.

Share

These windows are a ‘pain’!

submitted by Gary Selleck, owner, C and C Family Roofing

Windows usually bring a sense of joy this time of year due to a later sunset providing more sunlight and the visual display of the flowers and trees blooming. Those same windows can be the source of happiness or they can be the source of frustration.

Windows are the buffer between the atmosphere inside your house and the conditions outside. Unfortunately most homeowners are not even aware how bad their windows affect their lives.

The signs that your windows are causing problems include bad caulking around the frame of the window allowing water to penetrate the framing areas and insulation, condensation between the panes of glass due to seal failure between with the glass, poor weather stripping on the sashes or drafts penetrating through the window.

Sometimes the problems can be corrected with a simple service and some times more extensive repairs are required. If the windows need to be replaced consider these options, the energy efficiency of the glass, choose a reputable manufacturer with a sound warranty and hire a company that installs windows on a regular basis.

Sometimes price doesn’t tell the whole story so ask questions to get a feel if the installer is knowledgeable about product as well as installation. With summer here, contact a reputable window installer to help you decrease damage to your home and increase the savings on your heating and cooling bills because of better windows.

Share

Fresh, fabulous food for summer

submitted by McCaffrey’s

If you love food, you will not want to miss the upcoming, free event at McCaffrey’s supermarket. Join Chef Jean Pierre and Registered Dietitian Jill Kwasny on Thursday, June 20th at 10:00am at the Yardley store.

“Fresh and Fabulous Food for Summer” will be the highlight of this session.

Jean Pierre will share his creativity with seasonal foods that will delight your palate. You will have an opportunity to “ask the chef” and observe Jean Pierre’s cooking techniques.

Whether you are planning for a dinner party or a picnic, you will leave McCaffrey’s with some wonderful new recipe ideas to include in your summer menus.

Jill will compliment Jean Pierre’s cooking demonstration with a discussion on summer food safety. With the warmer weather finally here, it is essential to everyone’s well-being to take the time to prepare, store and serve foods so that they will both healthy and safe to enjoy. Whether it involves transporting food home from the grocery store or preparing food for a barbecue, learn how to keep food out of the danger zone!

If you would like to attend “Fresh and Fabulous Food for Summer” please RSVP to Joan Tardy at joan.tardy@mccaffreys.com or call 215- 752-9440 x138.

McCaffrey’s is located in Edgewood Village Shopping Center at 635 Heacock Road in Yardley.  

Share

Think inside the box and contain your veggie and herb gardening enthusiasm!

submitted by Joan Casanova, Green Earth Media Group

Thinking about veggie and herb gardening but don’t have a yard or live in an urban area? No worries. You can still join in and grow your own veggies and herbs in containers on a deck, patio, or balcony and reap a hefty harvest of fresh food for your dinner table.

Plant breeders know that after taste, home gardeners want a high yield in a small space, so they’ve developed varieties that can grow in a small area, and even flourish in containers. Here’s six simple steps to get you started.

1. Time-saving transplants – When you’re ready to begin potting up vegetables and herbs, opt for transplants – seedlings that have already been started – rather than starting from seed. Transplants will buy you lots of time because they’re six weeks or older when you put them in the pot, and you’ll begin harvesting much sooner too.

2. Use a premium quality potting mix. Don’t skimp here. A quality mix holds moisture but drains well; giving plant roots the perfect balance of air, moisture, and stability to grow a great harvest. Read bag labels to look for quality ingredients like: aged (composted) bark, perlite, lime or dolomite, and sometimes moisture-holding crystals. Quality potting mix stays fluffy all season long. It does not contain actual dirt that would compact with frequent watering.


3. Pick the right pot. It should be affordable to buy and fill, but large enough to accommodate your plants as they mature. Almost anything can serve as a container – flowerpots, pails, buckets, wire baskets, washtubs, window planters, even large food cans. Larger veggies, like tomatoes and eggplants, will need a larger container, at least five gallons for each plant. When in doubt, bigger is always better, the plants will look better and last longer because the roots will have more room to grow. Be sure the pot has a drainage hole in the bottom. And consider color: dark colored containers will absorb heat that could possible damage the plant roots. If you must use dark colored pots, try painting them a lighter color.

4. Feed your plants. Even if your potting mix came with fertilizer already mixed in, you may need to feed your plants. Some potting mixes include just enough fertilizer to give plants a charge when they’re starting. Mixes designed to feed for several months run out sooner in hot weather with frequent watering.

5. Put pots in a sunny spot. At least 6-8 hours is best. The sun drives energy for production and for making sugars, acids, and other compounds responsible for the fullest flavor. Make sure pots on a deck or porch get enough sunlight and move them to a sunny spot if shade encroaches.Without sun, the fruits will not ripen and the plants will be stressed.


6. Water regularly. Vegetables are at least 90% water. To produce well, they may need daily watering in hot weather since you can’t always rely on rain. Water plants at soil level and be sure to water before the sun goes down, leaves will need to dry before nightfall.

Be on the lookout for key words like: bush, compact, patio, baby, dwarf and space saver in their name, they’ll be a good bet. Just because a plant is bred to be small doesn’t mean the fruits will be small or the yield will be less.

Share