TMA Bucks begins management of Bucks Traffic Safety Program

TMA Bucks recently announced it has assumed management of the Bucks County Community Traffic Safety Program.

The Bucks County Community Traffic Safety Program, funded through a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, will work with law enforcement, local businesses, schools, and the community to reduce the number of annual highway deaths in Bucks County.

The program will target demographics with statistically higher numbers of traffic-related fatalities, including teens and senior citizens and specific behaviors that contribute to higher crash rates such as aggressive driving, driving under the influence, and distracted driving.

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Penn State Extension offers Master Well Owner training

Pennsylvania is home to over one million private water wells and springs but it is one of the few states that do not provide statewide regulations to protect these rural drinking water supplies. As a result, homeowners using a private well or spring must understand proper water supply management practices to ensure safe drinking water for their family. 

In 2004, Penn State Extension and several partner agencies created the Master Well Owner Network (MWON) – a group of trained volunteers who are dedicated to promoting the proper construction, testing, and maintenance of private water wells, springs and cisterns throughout Pennsylvania.

Since its inception, over 600 volunteers have attended Saturday training workshops to be certified as Penn State Master Well Owners. The next MWON volunteer training course will be held on Saturday, December 14th, from 9:00am to 3:30pm at the Neshaminy Manor Center, 1282 Almshouse Road, Doylestown. Prospective volunteers need to submit an application and be accepted into the program.

The December 14th training workshop will be limited to the first 30 accepted applicants. To be eligible for this program, volunteers must NOT have any financial interest in private water supplies (i.e. work for water well drillers, water testing labs, water treatment companies, etc.) and they must be willing to share what they learn with their neighbors, friends, and co-workers. 

Volunteers who successfully complete the training course and pass a short exam will receive a free copy of the 80 page publication, “A Guide to Private Water Systems in Pennsylvania,” a coupon good for a 10% discount on water testing through the Penn State water testing lab, and access to various MWON educational materials. 

To learn more about the program and to complete an application, visit the following website: http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/water/mwon/volunteer or contact Bryan Swistock at 814-863-0194 or brs@psu.edu.

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Nicole Savini earns Gold Award, makes her neighborhood safer

by Barbara Long

Nicole Savini of Feasterville will receive the Gold Award – the highest achievement in Girl Scouting – in June 2014 at the Girl Scouts of Eastern Pennsylvania Council. The award will recognize her efforts for conceiving, planning and completing a community project in her Sweetwater Farms neighborhood in Lower Southampton Township.

Several other award ceremonies will recognize Nicole’s achievements: one in May with her Service Unit, another with the VFW organization, and still another with Lower Southampton Township.

Nicole’s endeavor, which spanned roughly six months from conception to completion, resulted in painting house numbers on the street curbs of 148 homes in Sweetwater Farms. Making house numbers more visible greatly aids firefighters and emergency personnel in quickly identifying homes in need of assistance.

“Painting house numbers on curbs is very much a safety issue,” said Nicole’s mother Fran Savini, who is the leader of Girl Scout Troop #2598 to which her daughter belongs. “And it required permission from the township as well as from individual homeowners.”

Mother and daughter, who are the adult and girl delegates, respectively, for the Girl Scouts of Eastern Pennsylvania, discussed potential projects for Nicole to complete.

“Nicole likes art,” her mother said, “so she decided on the curb painting idea.”

Earning the Gold Award is about much more than coming up with an idea, however. For starters, Gold Award recipients join an elite group of women who, starting in 1916 with the Golden Eaglet insignia, undertake projects that improve their communities.

While the award itself has changed names over the years, with the Gold Award established in 1980, the extraordinary efforts of the recipients have continued to raise the bar for those who follow.

Open only to Girl Scouts in high school, the Gold Award challenges these young women to change the world, or at least their corner of it.  They do so through a seven-step project: 1) identify an issue, 2) investigate it thoroughly, 3) get help and build a team, 4) create a plan, 5) present the plan and gather feedback, 6) take action and 7) educate and inspire.

And they do so through a minimum 80 hours of effort. Even the funding for completing these community projects falls on the individual seeking the award.

Nicole, who is a 15-year-old sophomore at Neshaminy High School, held a flea market in her neighborhood to raise money for the materials needed to paint house numbers on the curbs. She raised $126 through the flea market and received an additional $30 through donations from her neighbors in Sweetwater Farms.

Her next step was to form a team to help with the project.  “I went to friends and people close to me,” Nicole pointed out.

One teammate was her older sister Christen, who recruited Nicole several years ago to help with her Gold Award project.

Christen, now 21, was involved with the Girl Scouts for 12 years.

Other members of Nicole’s team were: Rachel Barrett, Caitlin Gonglik, Breanna Murray and Kenny Williams.

Nicole noted that the enterprise taught her several valuable lessons. “I learned about how much it helped the community. Every time I was on the street painting the curb, someone would always come by thanking me. Someone even stopped by the house and gave me a gift! I was so shocked! I didn’t get a lot of responses at first, but I think when they saw the professional job, then I received a lot more responses. I also learned leadership and confidence. I think being a good leader requires a lot of confidence.”

She added, “I still have to write letters to the fire and ambulance personnel, and write up a form for the township to approve the project’s completion. And then I need to write up the final paperwork to present to the Girl Scouts.”

Nicole has been involved with the Scouts since she was in kindergarten.  She highly recommended the organization. “The benefits of Girl Scouts is having fun with your friends and at the same time learning and developing skills.”

PHOTO CAP: Nicole Savini next to one of the curb address numbers she painted for her Girl Scout Gold Award project.

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TMA Bucks begins management of Bucks Traffic Safety Program

TMA Bucks recently announced it has assumed management of the Bucks County Community Traffic Safety Program.

The Bucks County Community Traffic Safety Program, funded through a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, will work with law enforcement, local businesses, schools, and the community to reduce the number of annual highway deaths in Bucks County.

The program will target demographics with statistically higher numbers of traffic-related fatalities, including teens and senior citizens and specific behaviors that contribute to higher crash rates such as aggressive driving, driving under the influence, and distracted driving.

“TMA Bucks is excited to manage this important and life-saving program in Bucks County,” said TMA Bucks executive director Bill Brady. “Our organization has always been committed to providing leadership on highway safety issues in the county and this program will assist us in having the resources to reach more of the community.”

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TMA Bucks takes action on Lincoln Highway safety issue

TMA Bucks recently announced that a safety issue at the intersection of East Lincoln Highway and Highland Park Way has been resolved as Middletown Township has modified and improved the signalization to limit the high number of crashes that have occurred in this area.


TMA Bucks was approached by its member McCafferty Auto Group this past March because McCafferty Hyundai (1106 E. Lincoln Highway) was reporting problems with people traveling westbound on Route 1 and not paying attention to the traffic signal at Lincoln and Highland Park Way.

TMA Bucks immediately gathered representatives from Middletown Township, PennDOT and McCafferty to discuss the issue and possible improvements to make the area safer.

“The TMA always reacts quickly to bring all of the key stakeholders together when our members approach us with a problem or issue, especially one that concerns the safety of people in our community,” explained TMA Bucks executive director Bill Brady.


After a review of the problem by Middletown Township’s traffic engineer, the Township decided to move forward, with the major improvement being an additional traffic signal being placed on the existing pole at the corner of McCafferty’s driveway that would help people pay more attention to that intersection and light. Improvements were also made at the intersection of Lincoln Highway and Flowers Mill Road as louvers were installed on the existing traffic signals. The purpose of the louvers is to block the view of a signal from another approach.

“We were pleased to be able to participate in this joint effort to improve traffic safety in Middletown Township,” said Pat Mallon, Chairman of the Middletown Township Board of Supervisors. “Our thanks go out to McCafferty Auto Group for bringing the issue to our attention and to TMA Bucks for facilitating the involvement of all stakeholder groups. This is a great example of business and government working together to solve problems.”

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Solebury Township will ‘Light Up The Night!’ on Halloween

Solebury Township Parks & Recreation will be giving away all kinds of special “lighted” Halloween items on October 31st to promote safety awareness and to help make kids more visible when walking in the community on Trick or Treat night.

Park members will be located at the corner of Clydesdale Drive and Tarpan Circle in Peddler’s View (South) from 6:00 to 8:00pm to distribute a variety of Halloween novelties, like glow in the dark necklaces, light-up wands and spinning ghosts and lighted pumpkins.

Solebury’s Police Department will also participate as officers drive throughout the neighborhoods handing out similar items. 

Information on Parks and Recreation programs and facilities will also be available as park members hand out the new information guide and map to parents. And it’s all FREE.

So be sure to stop by and help “Light Up The Night!”

For more information, contact the Solebury Township Parks and Recreation at 215-297-5702 or visit www.soleburyparks@soleburytwp.org.

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Winter sports safety tips

For many athletes, winter is their favorite season of the year. Unfortunately, winter sports safety can be overlooked compared to other seasonal sports and activities.

The Pennsylvania Division of the American Trauma Society (ATSPA) reminds you to put safety first when engaging in winter sports. Winter sports and activities include skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, sledding, ice skating, ice hockey, etc.

A person may be an expert in the activity, or they may be a novice. Either way, ATSPA urges every winter sport athlete take these safety precautions, provided by www.safekids.org:

  • Always wear sport-specific, properly fitting safety gear when participating in winter sports.
  • Children and adolescents should always wear helmets when they ski, sled, snowboard and play ice hockey. There are different helmets for different activities.
  • Parents should wear helmets too. Remember, your children learn safety habits by watching you.
  • Dress in layers and wear warm, close-fitting clothes. Make sure that long scarves are tucked in so they do not get entangled in lifts, ski poles or other equipment.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink fluids before, during and after winter play. Heat exhaustion and heat strokes can still occur during winter months.
  • Kids – or caregivers – who become distracted or irritable, or begin to hyperventilate, may be suffering from hypothermia or altitude sickness, or they may be too tired to participate safely in winter sports. They need to go indoors to warm up and rest. Call 911 if you are worried for their safety.
  • Children under six should not ride a snowmobile, and nobody under 16 should drive one.
  • All snowmobile drivers and passengers should wear helmets designed for high-speed motor sports. A bike helmet isn’t sufficient for a four-wheeled motorcycle that can go up to 90 miles per hour.

For further information on winter sports safety, contact ATSPA at 717-766-1616.  ATSPA is a non-profit trauma prevention education organization dedicated to reducing suffering, disability and death due to trauma. ATSPA strives to help all Pennsylvanians survive and lead healthier lives through its trauma prevention education programs.

For information on their trauma prevention educational materials and/or programs, visit www.atspa.org.

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