Scenes from the NHS Gym Night

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Scenes from Gym Night at NHS

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Two Playwickian writers are winners of Scholastic Keystone Press Awards

 

For the second consecutive year, two Playwickian writers from Neshaminy High School are among the winners of the prestigious 2014 Scholastic Keystone Press Awards contest sponsored by the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association.

Op-Ed editors junior Jackson Haines and senior Emily Scott swept the Editorial Category capturing all three awards.

Jackson and the editorial board received first place for the article “Why we won’t publish the R-word.” Emily was honored with second place for “How the media stole Christmas” and “The importance of our First Amendment.” All three award-winning articles can be found on www.playwickian.com.

“After all of their hard work this year, Jackson and Emily deserve to be recognized as the top student editorial writers in the state,” Playwickian Adviser Tara Huber said. “This impressive award brings an immense amount of pride to The Playwickian newspaper and the Neshaminy community at large.”

Jackson and Emily will be honored at the Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, April 2nd, at the America East Newspaper Operations and Technology Conference at the Hershey Lodge in Hershey, PA.

PHOTO CAP: Emily Scott and Jackson Haines

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Langhorne Rotary honors ‘Student of the Month’

 

The Langhorne Rotary recently honored Megan Schafer, a senior at the Neshaminy High School, as their December Student of the Month. Megan is well known in the community as the captain of the Neshaminy Girls Soccer team, PIAA State Champions. She is also a member of the Neshaminy Girls Basketball team.

Megan, accompanied by her father at the Rotary luncheon, was introduced by William Ritchey, NHS Assistant Principal, and Rachel Clemens, Megan’s soccer coach. A certificate recognizing Megan as the Student of the Month was presented. Certificates were also presented to Megan for her success as the captain of the soccer team and to Rachel for her award as Girls Soccer Coach of the Year. Megan and Rachel brought the PIAA Champion Trophy to the meeting.

Aside from her athletic accomplishments, Megan is in the top five percent in her class academically and a member of the National Honor Society, and is involved in a number of service projects, particularly “Athletes Helping Athletes” at the high school.

Megan will attend Penn State in the fall to major in Spanish and math, as well as participating in sports, particularly soccer.

PHOTO CAP: Rachel Clemens (left) with Langhorne Rotary December Student of the Month, Megan Schafer.

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NHS Girls Soccer team makes history

 

by Matt Snider

The Neshaminy High School varsity girls’ soccer team has a lot to be proud of these days. Not only did they manage to finish an entire season with an unflawed record of 25-0, they managed to get the cherry on top and secure a state title.

“I call them my perfect girls now,” says varsity head coach Rachel Clemens of her undefeated squad. “And 25-0 is pretty much perfection.”

Their aspirations for perfection were something the girls had before the season even started. After having an impressive previous season that concluded with a state semi-final appearance, the girls of Neshaminy were determined to have an even more impressive year. “We talk about team goals at the beginning of the year and they said they wanted to go undefeated,” said Rachel. “They said they wanted to win a state championship.”

The season schedule would prove that going undefeated would be no easy task. The NHS girls would square off with both Council Rock North and Council Rock South High Schools, which in the end would only be decided by a goal. The biggest challenge of the season would come against a strong Pennsbury squad, in which Neshaminy trailed entering the half, only to tie the game later on in regulation before capturing the victory in overtime.

“My girls just had a ‘refuse-to-lose’ mentality about them. They wanted nothing more than to go undefeated and they felt like they could do it,” said Rachel.

After finishing the season undefeated, Neshaminy would lock a first place seed entering the district tournament and home-field advantage throughout the games. The home-field advantage would prove to be beneficial in the tournament, as it helped Neshaminy earn a 2-1 victory over a team from Spring-Ford who was, admittedly, not used to playing on a grass field.

“They had a lot to say when they came to Neshaminy because they felt like they had the better team on turf,” said Rachel of their rival. “After we won they had a lot to say as well about seeing us again.”

As luck or fate would have it, the two teams would get the chance to reunite once again in the finals. Although they would be playing one another again, the main difference this time would be that the match would be played at Hersey Stadium – a turf field.  This would be a difference that Spring-Ford pointed out.

“Many of the local papers in that area really felt that it was going to be their game this time around because it would be on turf,” said Rachel of the second matchup. “I was confident as a coach and I knew my girls were confident that we could beat them again.”

The confidence showed as the girls were able to come away with another 2-1 victory over Spring-Ford and secure a state title. The state title would be the first title in NHS history in girls’ varsity soccer.

After stamping their names on a state title, Neshaminy can begin to look forward to next year and the ever-improving soccer program. The team will also have to adjust to the loss of seven players who will graduate.

“I’ve been coaching a lot of these girls since they were freshman so the upcoming players will have some big shoes to fill,” said Rachel. “I’m just extremely proud of these girls for accomplishing something that hasn’t been done and setting a high standard that every other team is going to try to live up to for years to come.”

The members of the championship team are Jessica Kelly, Holly Bowser, Sarah Hertenberger, Shannon Fisher, Katie McCoy, Amy Mandia, Katie Suchodolski, Gabby Farrell, Stephanie Donahue (captain), Nicole Nisivoccia, Alyssa Antonelly, Julia Andreozzi, McKenna Mullin, Megan Schafer (captain), Lauren Morris, Alyssa Tobin, Fran Donato, Maggie Daeche, and Amy Heller (captain). Coaches are Rachel Clemens, Chelsea Deeter, and Rich Reice. 

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Neshaminy’s Interact Club visits Jefferson’s NICU on World Prematurity Day

by June Portnoy

Every year Neshaminy High School’s Interact Club leads the way during the school-wide March of Dimes Walk held in April.

“Over the past 15 years, our school has raised close to $20,000 in donations for the March of Dimes, primarily for research,” says Suzi Drake, Interact Club Advisor.

Suzi explains that this club is a lot more than participating in activities for the sake of raising money. “We want to make sure our members understand the underlying meaning and importance of the activities in which they engage.”

As a result, every year, approximately 25 of the nearly 100 Interact Club members have the opportunity to visit a local neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to see for themselves who they are helping when walking for the March of Dimes. The goal is that within the four years of attending the high school, every club member will get the chance to tour a NICU at least once.

This year club members toured Jefferson Hospital’s NICU on November 17th in honor of Worldwide Prematurity Day. Because this day also coincided with Veterans Day, students brought patriotic teddy bears, on which March of Dimes logos were printed, for the premature babies they visited.

Dr. Kolawole Solarin, a neonatology pediatric specialist at Jefferson, guided the students from room to room through the 40-bed Level III unit. He explained security procedures, defined prematurity (any baby born before 37 weeks) and described how various equipment helps babies achieve positive outcomes. Students were allowed to approach approximately 20 babies in the NICU, provided they had no physical contact with them.

“I wasn’t expecting them to be connected to so many machines or to be so tiny,” said Angelique Geronimo, a senior from Levittown. “Even though I show club members pictures of these preemies, they don’t do them justice,” explained Suzi. “Only when you see them for yourself, can you truly appreciate their size.”

The smallest baby in the NICU the day of the tour was 1½ pounds.

“I was impressed at how well the nurses took care of these babies,” said Jasmin Tharakan, a senior from Feasterville. There were several nurses assigned to each room, and many of these nurses specialized in different areas, like one who specialized in respiratory problems.”

Dr. Solarin explained how nurses are trained to monitor these babies’ heartbeat, breathing and body temperature.

“It was nice to see who we are raising money for during the March of Dimes Walk, and how this money helps these preemies,” said Emily Singer, a senior from Langhorne.

“All babies in the NICU during the tour were thriving and progressing nicely,” added Suzi.

There is no doubt that touring the NICU made a lasting impact on Interact Club members.

“Seeing those babies lying there made me appreciate my health in a whole new way,” said

Austin Bocci, a junior from Langhorne. “I now have a clear visual of what those little babies go through.”

“After seeing those preemies, I believe that the images of those babies will never go away,” said Jasmine.

She added, “Next year when I walk for the March of Dimes, I will feel more motivated to walk, having seen how our donations are helping these babies.”

“I’ve been thinking about becoming a nurse,” said Angelique, “and coming here has helped me affirm my career choice. In fact, now I’m considering becoming a NICU nurse.”

“Another benefit of visiting this unit and learning more about preemies is that these students now know about the resources that the March of Dimes offers,” says Suzi. “Therefore, in the future if they know of anyone having a preemie, or if down the road they end up having one, they probably won’t be as fearful of the process after coming here.”

Interact Clubs are a great opportunity for students between the ages of 12 and 18 to have fun while carrying out a variety of service projects and learning about the world. Neshaminy High School’s Interact Club is linked with the Rotary Clubs of Langhorne and Feasterville.

The mission of the March of Dimes is to help moms have full-term pregnancies and to research the problems that threaten the health of babies.

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Neshaminy’s Interact Club visits Jefferson’s NICU on World Prematurity Day

 

by June Portnoy

Every year Neshaminy High School’s Interact Club leads the way during the school-wide March of Dimes Walk held in April.

“Over the past 15 years, our school has raised close to $20,000 in donations for the March of Dimes, primarily for research,” says Suzi Drake, Interact Club Advisor.

Suzi explains that this club is a lot more than participating in activities for the sake of raising money. “We want to make sure our members understand the underlying meaning and importance of the activities in which they engage.”

As a result, every year, approximately 25 of the nearly 100 Interact Club members have the opportunity to visit a local neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to see for themselves who they are helping when walking for the March of Dimes. The goal is that within the four years of attending the high school, every club member will get the chance to tour a NICU at least once.

This year club members toured Jefferson Hospital’s NICU on November 17th in honor of Worldwide Prematurity Day. Because this day also coincided with Veterans Day, students brought patriotic teddy bears, on which March of Dimes logos were printed, for the premature babies they visited.

Dr. Kolawole Solarin, a neonatology pediatric specialist at Jefferson, guided the students from room to room through the 40-bed Level III unit. He explained security procedures, defined prematurity (any baby born before 37 weeks) and described how various equipment helps babies achieve positive outcomes.

Students were allowed to approach approximately 20 babies in the NICU, provided they had no physical contact with them.

“I wasn’t expecting them to be connected to so many machines or to be so tiny,” said Angelique Geronimo, a senior from Levittown.

“Even though I show club members pictures of these preemies, they don’t do them justice,” explained Suzi. “Only when you see them for yourself, can you truly appreciate their size.”

The smallest baby in the NICU the day of the tour was 1½ pounds.

“I was impressed at how well the nurses took care of these babies,” said Jasmin Tharakan, a senior from Feasterville. There were several nurses assigned to each room, and many of these nurses specialized in different areas, like one who specialized in respiratory problems.”

Dr. Solarin explained how nurses are trained to monitor these babies’ heartbeat, breathing and body temperature.

“It was nice to see who we are raising money for during the March of Dimes Walk, and how this money helps these preemies,” said Emily Singer, a senior from Langhorne.

“All babies in the NICU during the tour were thriving and progressing nicely,” added Suzi.

There is no doubt that touring the NICU made a lasting impact on Interact Club members.

“Seeing those babies lying there made me appreciate my health in a whole new way,” said

Austin Bocci, a junior from Langhorne. “I now have a clear visual of what those little babies go through.”

“After seeing those preemies, I believe that the images of those babies will never go away,” said Jasmine.

She added, “Next year when I walk for the March of Dimes, I will feel more motivated to walk, having seen how our donations are helping these babies.”

“I’ve been thinking about becoming a nurse,” said Angelique, “and coming here has helped me affirm my career choice. In fact, now I’m considering becoming a NICU nurse.”

“Another benefit of visiting this unit and learning more about preemies is that these students now know about the resources that the March of Dimes offers,” says Suzi. “Therefore, in the future if they know of anyone having a preemie, or if down the road they end up having one, they probably won’t be as fearful of the process after coming here.”

Interact Clubs are a great opportunity for students between the ages of 12 and 18 to have fun while carrying out a variety of service projects and learning about the world. Neshaminy High School’s Interact Club is linked with the Rotary Clubs of Langhorne and Feasterville.

The mission of the March of Dimes is to help moms have full-term pregnancies and to research the problems that threaten the health of babies.

PHOTO CAP: NHS Interact Club members with teddy bears for the preemies they visited at Jefferson Nicu. Back row from left, Angelique Geronimo and Yoonjung Kim; middle row, Devon MacDougall, Jaslin Tharakan, Virgina Anselmi, Jessica Sooby, Lizzie Arbegast, Janel Guzman, Lauren Chelenza, Shelby Prizer, Sarah Silenok, Jenn Chamberlain, and JoAnne Mamie; front row, Adrienne Berue, Julia Tchourumoff, Emily Singer, Jasmin Tharakan, Austin Bucci, Senanur Anal, Sam Orr, and Courtney Miller.

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NHS students perform with All-National Honors Ensembles in Nashville

Rachel Jones, Chris Perugini and Jasmin Tharakan, from Neshaminy High School, have been selected as members of the 2013 NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles sponsored by the National Association for Music Education (NAfME).

Rachel performed with the band, while Chris and Jasmin performed with the choir.

The students joined more than 670 of the most musically talented and skilled high school students in the United States to perform at a gala concert on October 30th in Nashville, TN. These exceptional students prepared remarkably challenging music that they performed under the baton of four of the most prominent conductors in the United States: Dr. Peter Boonshaft, Miriam Burns, Rollo Dilworth, and Rodney Whitaker.

The NAfME All-National Honors Ensembles, consisting of a concert band, symphony orchestra, mixed chorus, and jazz ensemble, are organized by members of NAfME.

The concert band and symphony orchestra each has approximately 350 vocalists. Eligible students have qualified for their state-level honor ensemble program and competed against top students for a spot in these national honor ensembles.

NAfME, among the world’s largest arts education organizations, is the only association that addresses all aspects of music education. NAfME advocates at the local, state, and national levels; provides resources for teachers, parents, and administrators; hosts professional development events; and offers a variety of opportunities for students and teachers.

The Association orchestrates success for millions of students nationwide and has supported music educators at all teaching levels for more than a century.

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NHS students perform with All-National Honors Ensembles in Nashville

 

Rachel Jones, Chris Perugini and Jasmin Tharakan, from Neshaminy High School, have been selected as members of the 2013 NAfME All-National Honor Ensembles sponsored by the National Association for Music Education (NAfME).

Rachel performed with the band, while Chris and Jasmin performed with the choir.

The students joined more than 670 of the most musically talented and skilled high school students in the United States to perform at a gala concert on October 30th in Nashville, TN. These exceptional students prepared remarkably challenging music that they performed under the baton of four of the most prominent conductors in the United States: Dr. Peter Boonshaft, Miriam Burns, Rollo Dilworth, and Rodney Whitaker.

The NAfME All-National Honors Ensembles, consisting of a concert band, symphony orchestra, mixed chorus, and jazz ensemble, are organized by members of NAfME.

The concert band and symphony orchestra each has approximately 350 vocalists. Eligible students have qualified for their state-level honor ensemble program and competed against top students for a spot in these national honor ensembles.

NAfME, among the world’s largest arts education organizations, is the only association that addresses all aspects of music education. NAfME advocates at the local, state, and national levels; provides resources for teachers, parents, and administrators; hosts professional development events; and offers a variety of opportunities for students and teachers.

The Association orchestrates success for millions of students nationwide and has supported music educators at all teaching levels for more than a century.

PHOTO CAP: From left, Jasmin Tharakan, Chris Perugini, and Rachel Jones.

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Scenes from Neshaminy High School Homecoming

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