Friends of the Delaware Canal

The Friends of the Delaware Canal (FODC) is an independent, non-profit organization working to restore, preserve and improve the Canal and its surroundings. Its primary goals are to ensure that the Canal is fully watered and the towpath trail is usable over its entire length. The Friends embrace this mission because they believe the 58.9 mile-long Canal provides a unique link to our heritage; beautiful, diverse natural areas; and exciting educational and recreational opportunities.

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Bucks County Conservation District

Bucks County Conservation District is a unit of state government and was authorized and formed by the Bucks County Board of Commissioners on April 24th, 1961. The district program spans the range of federal, state and local responsibilities and funding is secured through grants, contracts and fees for services.

Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control is the primary area of concern for the Conservation District. Sediment by volume is the largest non-point source of pollution to the waters of Pennsylvania. Erosion and sediment pollution occur when man’s activities destroy the natural cover of the earth. This takes place during plowing and tilling and by other earth-moving operations during construction.

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G.O.A.L.

G.O.A.L. (Greenbelt Overhaul Alliance of Levittown) is an IRS 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization formed in early 2009.  G.O.A.L. is dedicated to cleaning Levittown greenways and tributaries of debris; elimination of waterway damming by debris; removal of undesirable plant species with replacement by desirable species; and the ongoing maintenance of these remediated areas. With an emphasis on in-school education and participation of school children and partnering with ecology clubs from educational institutes and other interested parties, G.O.A.L. is able to better promote care and understanding of its shared ecology. The public at large has access to its free seminars on ecology and related subjects that G.O.A.L. presents 10 times a year at the Bristol Township Municipal Building auditorium.

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G.O.A.L.

G.O.A.L. (Greenbelt Overhaul Alliance of Levittown) is an IRS 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization formed in early 2009.  G.O.A.L. is dedicated to cleaning Levittown greenways and tributaries of debris; elimination of waterway damming by debris; removal of undesirable plant species with replacement by desirable species; and the ongoing maintenance of these remediated areas. With an emphasis on in-school education and participation of school children and partnering with ecology clubs from educational institutes and other interested parties, G.O.A.L. is able to better promote care and understanding of its shared ecology. The public at large has access to its free seminars on ecology and related subjects that G.O.A.L. presents 10 times a year at the Bristol Township Municipal Building auditorium.

G.O.A.L.’s work is carried out by a core of volunteers from within the community. Their officers, board of directors and volunteers serve without monetary compensation.

Visit www.LTownGoal.com to learn about what G.O.A.L. does. Reach them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/levittowngoal.

G.O.A.L.’s accomplishments since May of 2009 include:

  • 13 miles of waterway cleaned;
  • 250 tons of rubbish removed;
  • 2,600 tires removed and recycled;
  • 1,800 native trees and shrubs planted;
  • 50,000 square feet of wildflowers planted;
  • 48 cubic yards of plastics and aluminum recycled;
  • 25,000 pounds of steel provided to homeless coalitions to trade for funds;
  • 28 public seminars sponsored;
  • 13,500 volunteer hours donated;
  • 11 awards won;
  • 28 organizations partnered with.
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Friends of the Delaware Canal

The Friends of the Delaware Canal (FODC) is an independent, non-profit organization working to restore, preserve and improve the Canal and its surroundings. Its primary goals are to ensure that the Canal is fully watered and the towpath trail is usable over its entire length. The Friends embrace this mission because they believe the 58.9 mile-long Canal provides a unique link to our heritage; beautiful, diverse natural areas; and exciting educational and recreational opportunities.

They accomplish their goals through advocacy, programs, partnerships, community volunteers and fundraising. In keeping with the goal of educating people about the Canal, the Friends have restored the Locktender’s House in New Hope and have opened it as a museum and visitors’ center.

Members of the group are also available to visit schools and organizations to conduct programs on the Canal and Canal life.

In addition, the Friends hold walks, bike hikes, and other activities to acquaint people with the historic Canal and its opportunities.

The Delaware Canal was completed in 1832 and runs from Bristol to Easton. Its primary purpose was to transport coal from northeast Pennsylvania to cities, but it also hauled many other kinds of cargo. Commercial use of the Canal dwindled and in 1931, it became a Pennsylvania State Park. In 1978, the Delaware Canal was designated a National Historic Landmark.

Flood repair projects extending from Easton south to Yardley are underway and expected to be completed in spring 2014. Check www.fodc.org to get updated information about open and closed sections of the towpath.

The Friends are always looking for volunteers to assist with Clean-Up Day held in April of each year and other project and activities. Contact the Friends of the Delaware Canal at 215-862-2021, by email at friends@fodc.org, or go to the FODC website, www.fodc.org, for more information.

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Bucks County Conservation District

Bucks County Conservation District is a unit of state government and was authorized and formed by the Bucks County Board of Commissioners on April 24th, 1961. The district program spans the range of federal, state and local responsibilities and funding is secured through grants, contracts and fees for services.

Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control is the primary area of concern for the Conservation District. Sediment by volume is the largest non-point source of pollution to the waters of Pennsylvania. Erosion and sediment pollution occur when man’s activities destroy the natural cover of the earth. This takes place during plowing and tilling and by other earth-moving operations during construction.

The Conservation District staff works with farmers, construction and home building personnel and the general public in an effort to reduce or eliminate sediment pollution. They offer technical assistance, oversight and education about issues pertaining to soil, water and erosion and sediment control. In addition to their Erosion and Sediment Control Technicians, they have an Agricultural Technician, a Watershed Specialist and an Educator who is available for school and public programs on staff.

For more information on BCCD, including watershed and educational programs, visit their newly designed website at www.bucksccd.org or visit their Facebook page.

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