Is your medical malpractice claim actionable under law?

submitted by Edward S. Shensky, Esq. and Leslie A. Mitnick, R.N., Esq., Stark & Stark

Medical malpractice, a fairly common legal claim, requires four elements that must be met to prove the case. These four elements are duty, breach, causation and damages.

Duty refers to the responsibility that the healthcare provider has to the patient to act both reasonably and appropriately in providing care or treatment to said patient. In a healthcare provider/patient relationship, the provider has a duty to act within the “standard of care” for the patient and must act as would any other provider, in his or her area of expertise, given the circumstances.

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Early social communication skills predict success into adulthood

submitted by Jennifer Niemeyer, M.S. CCC-SLP, Yardley Speech and Language, www.yardleyspeechandlanguage.com

Back to school time is both exhausting and exciting. A million details, including clothing, pencils, folders and aftercare need to come together to get your kids off to a good start. When the stars align properly, you put your child on the bus, wave “goodbye” and relax.

Sort of.

Will he like his teacher? Will she make friends? These are thoughts most parents have, and for good reason.

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Putting a loved one in a nursing home or long term care facility

by Carin A. O’Donnell, Esq., Stark & Stark

As your loved ones age or become disabled, you may need to decide the type of care or facility they may require. Families often seek legal assistance when dealing with negligent assisted living homes, nursing homes, rehabilitation facilities and group homes.

Many cases arise from residents suffering from pressure ulcers or bedsores, caused by pressure restricting blood flow to a certain area and resulting in the skin beginning to die. If someone is left in a chair or bed too long, or left sitting in feces, the skin can break down and develop sores.

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Making the most of local and seasonal produce this summer

submitted by Alex Buccino, RD at Shoprite

Summer is probably the most well known season for produce. The fresh flavors and vibrant colors seem to be more appealing in the warmer summer months. Here are some tips for how to make the most out of your produce this season.

What is in season during the summer?

Beets, bell peppers, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, cantaloupe, cherries, corn, cucumbers, grapes, grape tomatoes, eggplant, peaches, nectarines, summer squash, zucchini and watermelon just to name a few, are all especially delicious during this time.

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Recipe for Chipotle Molasses BBQ

submitted by Charcoal Bistro on the River, Yardley

1 onion, rough chopped

3 garlic cloves, rough chopped

778g plum tomatoes

32g ketchup

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Life in the healthy aisle

submitted by Alex Buccino, RD, LDN, Retail Dietitian at ShopRite of Yardley

Retail Dietitian at Shoprite debunks the following nutrition myths she hears on a regular basis:

  1. You have to eat less to lose weight. This statement could not be further from the truth. If anything, it’s best to eat more frequently, but with controlled portion sizes. This helps you stay satiated throughout the day while still being able to lose or maintain your weight. You should never feel like you are starving yourself to lose weight!
  2. Carbs make you fat. Carbohydrates are an extremely important part of a well-balanced diet. The key is eating the right types of carbohydrates. Yes, carbs do increase blood sugars. However, if you are consuming more whole grains, vegetables, beans, whole fruits and minimally process carbs, you can actually keep tight control of your blood sugars.
  3. Low fat foods are better. Often times, buying low fat or fat-free products are actually worse for you, as companies will add in extra sugar to replace the fat lost and make the product still taste good. Also, fats are crucial for our bodies to absorb critical nutrients, such as the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. Look for foods containing the right kinds of “healthy fats,” such as salmon or other fatty fish, avocado, nuts and seeds, and cheese.
  4. Eggs raise cholesterol levels. Cholesterol levels in the body are affected by trans fats and particularly saturated fats, not cholesterol from food itself. Eggs contain zero grams of trans fats and very little saturated fat- only 1.5 g per large egg. Eggs also contain 13 naturally occurring vitamins and minerals, making them a great part of a balanced diet.
  5. Healthier food is more expensive than “regular” food. Eating healthy does not mean you have to spend more money. Shop the weekly sales and purchase seasonal varieties for the best deals. Purchase frozen or canned fruits and vegetables, which provide the same nutrients at a lower cost. Look for ones that do not contain added sauces or sugars, and for those with low sodium or that say “no salt added.”
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Kindergarten ADHD no match for neurofeedback

submitted by Dr. Maria DiDonato, D.Ed. Psychologist, Achievement & Wellness Center, www.achievewell.net

Buddy (not his real name) was a very active kindergartener with ADHD. His behaviors were disruptive in the classroom and frequently resulted in him being sent to the office. He did not respond favorably to redirection, which often resulted in additional consequences.

Sibling issues were often problematic resulting in additional parental involvement to deescalate. Buddy seemed to not “get it” when redirected and appeared defiant with adults, in his own little way.

Parents were concerned that Buddy was not making satisfactory progress in school. His behavioral plan at school was not very effective in helping him with classwork and was proving to be frustrating to parents and teacher. Mother expressed concern about his poor performance that could become an academic problem.

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What an e-waste!

submitted by Sarah Bergen, Blogger/Publicist, Exact Solar

The kids are back at school, armed with new cell phones to keep in touch (or just take selfies and post to their SnapChat stories) and new laptops to type essays, answer emails and play games (hopefully all three, and not just the last!).

But what do you do with the old, left-behind gadgets? You may have a drawer full of old cell phones, or a dinosaur of a television collecting dust in the basement.

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Neurofeedback easily calms oppositionality

submitted by Dr. Maria DiDonato, D.Ed. Psychologist, Achievement & Wellness Center, www.achievewell.net

Andy (not his real name), a 12-year-old, had difficulty at home and school with anger and rage issues, as well as ADHD. Behaviors were often defiant and uncooperative.

He was destructive from a young age. Besides always seeming restless and even anxious, he could not stay on task and was very disorganized. He often reported stomach discomfort. Medication did not seem to be helping all these troubling behaviors, which were negatively affecting him at home and school, both socially and academically.

Parents expressed concern for depression at such a young age. A family friend whose child was benefitting from neurofeedback recommended Andy try this treatment.

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Renewable energy growth in Pennsylvania

submitted by Sarah Bergen, Blogger/Publicist, Exact Solar

With only four percent of Pennsylvania’s energy currently coming from renewable sources, achieving 100% renewable energy can seem like an impossible feat. But the state is moving forward and away from dirty fossil fuels.

Pennsylvania has a long road ahead to 100% renewable energy, but the Wind Energy Foundation is working to shed light on how far the state has already come. Through a project called A Renewable America, the nonprofit is raising public awareness of how each of the six major sources of renewable energy – solar, biomass, geothermal, hydro, waste-to-energy, and wind power – are already powering the state of Pennsylvania.

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