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Falls seeks grant for adaptive traffic signals

With an eye on helping to reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality – all while being fiscally responsible – the Falls Township Supervisors set the wheels in motion for a grant request. If received, the grant would largely fund an adaptive traffic project.

The board has voted unanimously to accept a grant and proposal that Remington & Vernick Engineers will submit to the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on behalf of the township.

The Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program provides 80% funding, with a 20% local funding match, for transportation projects that it determines to reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality.

Falls intends to apply for a grant to install adaptive traffic signals at heavily traveled roads throughout the township, including Lincoln Highway, West Trenton Avenue and Oxford Valley Road.

Officials said adaptive traffic signals adjust almost instantly to the changes in traffic.

Instead of motorists having to wait for a pre-determined traffic cycle, adaptive traffic signals would change based on the volume of vehicles in any given lane, meaning the lane with no cars in it, for example, would not be given the green light while drivers in other lanes waited their turn.

The Supervisors approved Remington & Vernick Engineers to undertake the application, which is more than 20 pages long, at a cost not to exceed $4,500.

Applications are due to the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission by June 28th.

The Commission anticipates awarding grants during its October 24th meeting.

A Remington & Vernick official told the board that Middletown Township recently finished an adaptive traffic project which has been shown to dramatically reduce traffic congestion.