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    Neurofeedback can calm Reactive Attachment Disorder

    submitted by Dr. Maria DiDonato, D.Ed. Psychologist, Achievement & Wellness Center, www.achievewell.net

    Louise (not her real name), an eight-year-old child from Bordentown, had difficulty with aggression, anxiety and interacting poorly with others.

    She was unable to live at home with her siblings because of her extreme difficulty with behavioral and impulse controls.

    Being diagnosed with Reactive Attachment Disorder, associated with early childhood trauma, there were significant behavioral concerns.

    Some of the behaviors she displayed include being easily distracted and fidgeting, lacking patience, getting in trouble frequently, having tantrums, defying rules, being excessively stubborn, angry, resentful, initiating fights, pushing others around and being physically cruel to others.

    Her adoptive parents were not seeing progress in the placement she was in, and some problematic behaviors appeared to be escalating.

    They believed the setting was not a good fit for Louise, and they withdrew her.

    Parents were hoping for an alternative to the myriad of medications and behavioral plans that seemingly were not effective in managing Louise’s behaviors.

    They were advised to consider neurofeedback as an option.  They came to our office for neurofeedback, a form of brain wave biofeedback.

    After the initial treatment, parents noticed that she was much less impulsive in stores. Behavior at restaurants was calmer around food issues.

    During the sessions she appeared calm and pleasant, reporting that she was feeling calmer.

    Louise has completed 12 sessions and her social skills are already improving. She is re-enrolled in a different less restrictive school and making satisfactory progress.

    Parents are very pleased with Louise’s progress so far and are looking forward to re-integrating her with the family shortly. It is very encouraging to see Louise make such great progress.

    The expectation is that with continued treatment she will be able to live a more normal and happy life with her family and peers.

    Her future appears much brighter with better emotional, and behavioral balance.