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    A home ‘spring cleaning’ recipe find

    submitted by Earl Arrowood – Professor, BCCC Culinary Arts & Chef Apprenticeship Programs Coordinator

    First, the back story. The home I was raised in (and currently share with my wife and mother) my mother and father purchased in 1956 from Mrs. Annie Scott, who had owned it since 1947.

    This lovely Doylestown Victorian was built in 1900 and we DO have the entire history of the house. Quite remarkably a cookbook came with the house through the subsequent sales, remained intact but quite tattered, and we proudly have it to this day.

    In 1906 this historically significant cookbook: “Marion Harland’s  (née Mary Virginia Hawes Terhune) Complete Cook Book” on pages 464-465 (of 781 pages total) there is a lovely recipe I was motivated to share.

    I have made these, using this recipe as a basis, however with contemporary “Internet extracted” ideas and modifications… and they are simply good.

    “Green Pea Fritters” (in her own words)

    “Shell enough peas to make a quart without the pods. Lay the peas in cold water for half an hour; put over the fire in two quarts of boiling salted water and cook for half an hour, or until very tender, but not broken. Drain free of water, turn into a bowl and mash soft with two tablespoonfuls of butter and with salt to taste. Beat four eggs very light, add to them three gills* of milk and a cupful of flour with which has been sifted a teaspoonful of baking powder and a half teaspoonful of salt. Stir the mashed peas by the great spoonful into this mixture and beat until you have a smooth, light green batter. Have your soapstone griddle very hot and drop your batter by the spoonful upon this. When done on one side turn and bake to a delicate brown. Serve very hot as a vegetable to accompany any kind of meat or poultry.”

    Note* A “gill” in contemporary kitchen measure in the U.S. = 4 fl. oz. (½ cup)