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Tips for a successful generator installation

submitted by Dan Harrison, Owner, Harrison Generator, www.harrisongenerator.com

With severe storms becoming more common across the U.S., and an aging electrical infrastructure, the need for reliable residential standby power is at an all time high.

Local building departments are constantly seeing applications for new standby generators being installed all over Bucks County.

The brand of generator you decide on is a big portion of the equation, but even the best generator installed poorly will inevitably let you down at the worst time.

Picking the best installer is a critical step to ensure your generator works when you need it most. Look for a factory authorized dealer, check references, and ask questions.

Generator installation is not a do it yourself type of project. Trust a professional. Keep in mind, EVERY generator installation requires a permit from the local municipality.

While propane tanks and lines are exempt from permitting, natural gas lines, the generator itself, and the electrical installation are not.

Make sure your contractor obtains a permit, and make sure the required inspections are performed before final payment.

Before installing a natural gas generator, you or your contractor MUST contact PECO to determine service adequacy.

Only PECO will know if the line from the road to your house will support a generator and your heater simultaneously in the dead of winter.

Fuel draw on a generator is typically higher then all of your existing appliances combined. An upgraded meter is most always required.

After-sales support is important as well. Generators require service on an annual basis. Not just an oil change either, but a full system check.

Batteries are the weakest link and proper testing and proactive replacement are key to a reliable unit. Engage in an annual maintenance contract and leave it to a professional to maintain.

There is no second chance when the unit fails to start during an outage.